Not just your everyday storm prep

White sandy beaches, lush greenery and turquoise waters don’t stay that way for long when a tropical storm or hurricane is barreling down on your island. Yet my experience with Tropical Storm Arthur in 1990, in my position as assistant information technologist in Grenada’s National Water and Sewage Authority, is just one major incident in the past 25 years that has fueled my passion for helping create the energy company of the future at PSE&G. Continue reading

PSE&G keeps The Iron Horse Restaurant cooking

When PSE&G replaced aging gas pipes in the Borough of Westwood as part of its Gas System Modernization Program, the work took crews right in front of The Iron Horse Restaurant on Washington Avenue. Needless to say, The Iron Horse owner Lee Tremble was concerned about how this work would impact his business. After all, closing the restaurant or blocking pedestrians would mean losing customers and money.  Much to his surprise, that wasn’t the case.

“It was pretty much an extraordinary experience,” said Tremble. “PSE&G worked around my schedule. The crew started work early and made sure to finish their work by the time I opened each day at 11:30 a.m. I never lost one minute of operation. And when the first bill came after the upgrade, the gas part of my bill went down because everything was running more efficiently. Everything PSE&G said they were going to do, came to be.”

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Gas system delivery improvements would enhance safety and resiliency

Within an hour on the morning of Jan. 21, a major energy transportation company experienced a rupture to a gas transmission pipeline in Ohio and an equipment malfunction in Rhode Island. The first incident severely injured two people and damaged area homes while the second precipitated a gas outage for more than 10,000 people. In winter’s cold, no one wants to be without heat, or worse, injured in a gas incident.
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A 115-year-old company that’s just getting started

“To develop the state of New Jersey and make it a better place to live.”

When Thomas N. McCarter uttered those words after taking the helm of the Public Service Corp. in 1903, he was thinking about how to meet New Jerseyans’ growing need for more modern and efficient sources of heat, light and (at that time) transportation.

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Should another Sandy Strike, Energy Strong Work Would Keep the Lights on for Many


To many, summer is synonymous with beaches and backyard barbeques. To me, and the people at PSE&G who power your homes and businesses, the season also means hot weather and storms that can stress and damage our equipment. Fortunately, because of investments we’re making in our system, we’re more ready than ever to withstand severe weather. Continue reading

A Plant Grows in Woodbridge

Stop by the Sewaren 7 construction site in Woodbridge Township, New Jersey, and you’ll experience the hustle and bustle of a staggering volume of activity – massive machinery moving dirt, cement being poured, sparks flying from welders’ guns. On any given day, you will find between 450 and 500 skilled workers building what will soon be the most efficient, clean, state-of-the-art gas generation plant in the Garden State.

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Protecting Those in Danger

At first glance, Swamp Pink, a member of the lily family, the Golden-winged Warbler, a small migratory bird, and the Frosted Elfin, a butterfly native to North America, couldn’t be less alike. Yet despite their obvious differences, they all have something in common; all three are threatened or endangered species in New Jersey with habitats on and around the nearly 1,000 miles of transmission rights-of-way (ROWs) that PSE&G owns and maintains in New Jersey. They have lots of company, too, as some 131 other threatened or endangered species make their homes on or near our ROWs.

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Everyone Wins With the Right Grid Policies

Vector lines power plant, power lines, industrial vector design, infrastructureThe concept of living “off the grid” isn’t just for those who want to shrink their environmental footprint.

In the wake of severe storms like Superstorm Sandy and most recently Hurricane Matthew, policymakers and others are looking increasingly to a number of so-called “distributed energy resources” to keep the lights on locally even when Mother Nature delivers devastating blows to utility equipment. Continue reading