Bringing the power of energy efficiency to more of our customers

Summit Plaza in Jersey City, New Jersey, is a four-building, 483-unit apartment complex that is home to mostly low-income families.

One of the most important missions for utilities going forward will be to help their customers develop low-cost, energy efficient options. Reducing the consumption of electricity and natural gas will provide a host of benefits – it will give customers access to new energy efficient technologies while also lowering their utility bills and reducing pollution and environmental impacts for years to come. Continue reading

A 115-year-old company that’s just getting started

“To develop the state of New Jersey and make it a better place to live.”

When Thomas N. McCarter uttered those words after taking the helm of the Public Service Corp. in 1903, he was thinking about how to meet New Jerseyans’ growing need for more modern and efficient sources of heat, light and (at that time) transportation.

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Americans Waste More Money On Energy Bills… Than Anything Else

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Low cost and no cost ways to save

In an ideal world everyone would go out and buy all new ENERGY STAR appliances, add insulation to their attics, and install the newest generation of smart thermostats. Yes, this would save people lots of money on their electric bills. But for most of our customers, that’s just not an affordable option in the short term. Continue reading

The Utility of The Future

girlwplantReducing consumption of electricity and natural gas means lower customer bills, healthier air and water and fewer greenhouse gas emissions. That’s why I believe that energy efficiency must be at the center of our nation’s energy policy. And utilities, like PSEG, are uniquely positioned to deliver those benefits to our customers, our country and the next generation.

The cheapest, cleanest energy is the energy you don’t use. Energy efficiency is by far the cheapest method of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Unleashing the full power of energy efficiency would save consumers billions of dollars nationwide—mitigating if not entirely offsetting the cost impact of necessary upgrades to our systems.

The environmental benefits of energy efficiency are equally impressive.  The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency estimates that energy efficiency improvements can achieve 23 percent of its carbon reduction goal for the nation through the year 2030. Continue reading