The buzz on why PSE&G studies bees

More than 75% of plants on earth require the help of a pollinator, such as a bee, butterfly or bat, to reproduce. Some experts estimate that these pollinators are responsible for one in every three bites of food humans eat. Unfortunately, many pollinators, especially bees, are in decline, which is threatening food production and other critical human needs. Continue reading

Building thriving communities through public-private partnerships – A look at why we support the PSEG Institute for Sustainability Studies at Montclair State University

Last week, I had the privilege of welcoming the talented and passionate Green Teams from the PSEG Institute for Sustainability Studies at Montclair State University as they presented their business- and environment-impacting projects to leaders from across New Jersey.

PSEG has a longstanding relationship with Montclair State University, including significant support for the PSEG Institute for Sustainability Studies that helps to bring the global principles of sustainability to an on-the-ground municipal level.

The PSEG Institute for Sustainability Studies is an exemplification of what Public Service founder Thomas McCarter wrote early in the 20th century that would become our company’s mission: “To help make New Jersey a better place to live.” That’s a guiding principle for our company that still holds true today – to build thriving communities.

Today, we work toward this goal by helping people to use less energy, to ensure that the energy they do use is generated in a way that is clean, green and climate-friendly, and to do these things while ensuring that delivery of that energy is as reliable and resilient as ever.

We call this our “Powering Progress” vision – and it’s that vision that brings us together with organizations like Montclair State University.

Green Teams

The fundamental role of the Green Teams and the talented, committed students who take up the challenge is to help public and private organizations apply the benefits of sustainability at a local level.

Thanks to PSEG’s ongoing support, the Green Teams, recently completing their fourth year, have contributed to the breadth of New Jersey, from state government agencies, such as New Jersey’s Department of Environmental Protection, to local agencies such as the Sussex County Municipal Utilities Authority. And the students’ work has benefited New Jersey’s cities such as Newark, Jersey City, Princeton and Montclair.

Their work has also benefited the fields of:

    • Higher education – at Centenary University, Essex County College, Fairleigh Dickinson University; Kean University, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Princeton University, Ramapo College, Raritan Valley Community College, Rider University, Rowan University, Rutgers University, Stockton University, The College of New Jersey, and William Paterson University;
    • Nonprofits – including Hydrogen House Project, Newark Science and Sustainability, and Sustainable Princeton;
    • The energy sector – with PSEG and NJ Natural Gas;

And more – including ADP, Bristol Myers Squibb, Earth Friendly Products/Ecos, Hackensack Meridian Health, Honeywell, NJM, NJ TRANSIT, NJ American Water, PGIM Real Estate, Stryker, and SUEZ.

This year’s Green Team for PSEG leveraged the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals to help illustrate and explain PSEG’s role in the world as a leader in sustainability to help us better communicate to a wide variety and rapidly expanding universe of stakeholders, which enables those stakeholders to make better, more informed decisions for the long-term.

At the end of the day, the many organizations that have benefited from the PSEG Green Teams all have at least one thing in common: A shared commitment to sustainability for the benefit of the community.

 Public-Private Partnerships

At PSEG, building thriving communities and making New Jersey a better place to live is part of our DNA. But we cannot do it alone.

We need partners.

The role of the modern utility is, at its core, a partnership. It’s a partnership between a company – in this case, PSEG – and public and private entities, whether it’s state or local government, their agencies or many of state’s higher education institutions or our state’s many successful private organizations, and ultimately with the citizens of the state.

By working in partnership with organizations like the PSEG Institute for Sustainability Studies at Montclair State University, we ensure that we provide the services that are most important to the communities we are committed to serve.

 Clean energy future

Today, as we confront the urgent need to address global climate change by reducing greenhouse gas emissions, we know we need to do more.

For years, PSEG has had one of the lowest carbon emissions intensity rates among the largest US generators. At PSE&G, we have proposed a $3.5 billion investment with our Clean Energy Future program, which features significant programs for energy efficiency, electric vehicle charging infrastructure, energy storage and advanced metering to help our customers use less energy.

Recently we also announced that we plan to reduce the carbon emissions from our power fleet by 80% by 2046 and that our vision – given the right advancements in technology and public policy – is to achieve net-zero carbon emissions by 2050.

PSEG’s longtime association with Montclair State University, and our support for the PSEG Institute for Sustainability Studies and for the student-led Green Teams, is another example of a public-private partnership that works to benefit New Jersey and its communities. It’s also a standout example of PSEG’s continuing role as a leader when it comes to furthering clean, sustainable energy for the benefit of the many, many communities we serve.

PSEG: One of lowest carbon emissions rates among largest U.S. power producers

PSEG announced it has one of the lowest carbon emissions rates of the nation’s largest power producers. As the deputy general counsel and managing director of environment at PSEG, I couldn’t be more proud of our achievements to date and the continued efforts across the company as we strive towards a clean energy future. Continue reading

How pruning keeps trees and power lines happily coexisting

og_fb_appid

“I never saw a discontented tree. They grip the ground as though they liked it, and, though fast rooted, they travel about as far as we do.” ~John Muir, American author and naturalist

My family thinks I am obsessed with trees. Perhaps that’s because I moved them into a home that has a 48-acre arboretum directly behind it. Maybe it’s because they constantly hear me offering little details about bark, or leaves or the branch system. Did you know, for example, that each branch operates independently yet for the common good of the whole – using its leaves to feed itself and then sending reserves to the root system to be used by the rest of the tree? Yes, I love trees. Continue reading

A Plant Grows in Woodbridge

Stop by the Sewaren 7 construction site in Woodbridge Township, New Jersey, and you’ll experience the hustle and bustle of a staggering volume of activity – massive machinery moving dirt, cement being poured, sparks flying from welders’ guns. On any given day, you will find between 450 and 500 skilled workers building what will soon be the most efficient, clean, state-of-the-art gas generation plant in the Garden State.

Continue reading

Sustainability: Building Today for Tomorrow

The late Yogi Berra once said, “It’s tough to make predictions, especially about the future.” I agree with Yogi’s wise words. No one knows for certain what the future will bring. But at PSEG we always try to plan for the next generation’s energy needs – with a strong focus on constantly improving how we provide energy solutions for our customers and the larger society around us.

Continue reading

It’s a Bird, It’s a Plane, It’s a Skycrane

On any given day, it’s not unusual to see helicopters hovering overhead in the Hackensack Meadowlands – monitoring traffic conditions or ferrying passengers between New York and New Jersey.

But the helicopter that drivers along the western spur of the New Jersey Turnpike saw early in October was anything but routine.  PSE&G used a specialized, heavy-lift helicopter called a Skycrane to deconstruct 13 existing transmission towers and construct 12 new 115-foot towers in the North Arlington meadows as part of the Northeast Grid Reliability Project. Continue reading

The Eaglets Are Ready To Soar  

IMG_2319

High atop a PSE&G transmission tower in Somerset County, two bald eaglets are preparing to spread their wings and leave their nest for the first time. When they do, they will sport colored identification bands on their legs thanks to the state’s environmental experts and a number of helping hands from my colleagues at PSE&G.   Continue reading

Powering NJ While Protecting the Environment

Constructed entirely using a helicopter, this structure is the tallest structure on the S-R Project, standing at 242’ and located in the middle of Lake Denmark in Rockaway, NJ.

Constructed entirely using a helicopter, this structure is the tallest structure on the S-R Project, standing at 242’ and located in the middle of Lake Denmark in Rockaway, NJ.

Energizing the Susquehanna-Roseland (S-R) transmission line on May 11 was a great moment for PSE&G, for PPL Electric Utilities, which built the portion of the line in Pennsylvania – and for the state of New Jersey.  As someone who was with the S-R project since its inception, I couldn’t be more pleased that this important electrical highway is now complete.

PJM, the regional transmission operator that operates the electric grid in New Jersey and other nearby states, first mandated the S-R project in 2007 to address reliability issues that would begin affecting the grid in 2012.  While PJM has been able to implement short-term fixes over the last three years, S-R was essential to ensure the long-term stability of the grid.  The project consisted of constructing a new 500-kilovolt line to augment an existing 80-year old line operating at 230-kilovolt – from the Susquehanna station in Berwick, Pa., to PSE&G’s Roseland switching station. This required PPL and PSE&G to rebuild the towers to carry both lines.  PSE&G built the 45-mile section of the line in New Jersey, while PPL built the 101-mile Pennsylvania portion.

S-R presented a number of complex engineering and construction challenges, none greater than the need to build the line across environmentally sensitive areas, including wetlands and a four-mile stretch through the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area.  PSE&G took a number of steps to minimize our impact on these areas and their native plants and wildlife.  For example, where we could we used helicopters for crew transport and tower installation, eliminating trucks, cranes and other project equipment from traveling along these environmentally sensitive areas.  (When the line was first constructed in the 1920s, PSE&G crews hauled metal for the towers using mules and wooden trailers over the rough and rocky terrain.)

Continue reading